India Education Diary : Eden of Education
 
Home India Education Diary : Home Admission India Education Diary : Admission Edu Policy India Education Diary : Edu Tender Scholarship India Education Diary : Scholarship Exam India Education Diary : Exams Notifications India Education Diary : Notifications Competitions Exam Results Edu Jobs Job
         
Exams
Entrance Exams
Competitive Exams
Civil Services Exams
Foreign Entrance Exam
   
Education Medium
Vocational Education
Correspondence Courses
Online Education
Distance Education
   
Study Aboard
Countries
Entrance Exam
Scholarship
Study Aboard
   
Loan/Award
Edu Loans
Scholarships
Awards
Top Job Sector
   
News
Latest Edu News
Edu Business News
   
     

Search
Make This Your Homepage   Bookmark Us   Download our Toolbar   Email Story   Feedback   Print Story
Carnegie Mellon Brain Imaging Research Shows How Unconscious Processing Improves Decision-Making
Thursday, February 14, 2013
  Related News
Book Review: Poet of the Revolution: Memoirs and Poems
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Author: Lal Singh Dil,
Translated By: Nirupama Dutt, Publisher: Penguin Viking, Pages: 216, Price: Rs.
Book Review: The Essential Ved Mehta
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Author: Ved Mehta
Publisher: Penguin Hamish Hamilton 
Pages: 400, Price: Rs.
Book Review: Patriots and Partisans
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Author: Ramachandra Guha
Publisher: Penguin Allen Lane
Pages: 352, Price: Rs.
Book Review: India Becoming: A Journey through a Changing Landscape
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Author:  Akash Kapur
Publisher: Penguin Viking, Price: Rs.
Book Review: The Pregnant King
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Author: Devdutt Pattanaik
Publisher: Penguin Books India, Pages: 360, Price: Rs.


Report by India Education bureau, Pittsburgh: When faced with a difficult decision, it is often suggested to "sleep on it" or take a break from thinking about the decision in order to gain clarity.
But new brain imaging research from Carnegie Mellon University, published in the journal "Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience," finds that the brain regions responsible for making decisions continue to be active even when the conscious brain is distracted with a different task. The research provides some of the first evidence showing how the brain unconsciously processes decision information in ways that lead to improved decision-making.
"This research begins to chip away at the mystery of our unconscious brains and decision-making," said J. David Creswell, assistant professor of psychology in CMU's Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences and director of the Health and Human Performance Laboratory. "It shows that brain regions important for decision-making remain active even while our brains may be simultaneously engaged in unrelated tasks, such as thinking about a math problem. What’s most intriguing about this finding is that participants did not have any awareness that their brains were still working on the decision problem while they were engaged in an unrelated task."
For the study, Creswell, recent CMU graduate James K. Bursley and Northeastern University's Ajay B. Satpute presented 27 healthy adults with information about cars and other items while undergoing neuroimaging. Then, before being asked to make decisions about the items, the participants had to complete a difficult distractor task — memorizing sequences of numbers — to prevent them from consciously thinking about the decision information.
The results included three main findings. First, the team confirmed previous research demonstrating that a brief period of distraction — in this case two minutes — produced higher quality decisions about the cars and other items. But did this effect occur because the distraction period provided an opportunity for the brain to take a break from decision-making and then return to the problem with a fresh look? Or alternatively, does the brain continue to unconsciously process decision information during this distraction period? This research supports the latter unconscious processing explanation.
When the participants were initially learning information about the cars and other items, the neuroimaging results showed activation in the visual and prefrontal cortices, regions that are known to be responsible for learning and decision-making. Additionally, during the distractor task, both the visual and prefrontal cortices continued to be active — or reactivated — even though the brain was consciously focused on number memorization.
Third, the results showed that the amount of reactivation within the visual and prefrontal cortices during the distractor task predicted the degree to which participants made better decisions, such as picking the best car in the set.
"We all face difficult problems we need to solve on a regular basis," Creswell said. "Whether it's buying a new car, finding a new apartment to rent, or seeking out a new dating partner on social networking sites. This study provides some of the first clues for how our brains process this information for effective problem-solving and decision-making."
Bursley (DC’12), who joined CMU’s Health and Human Performance Laboratory as a freshman, spent his undergraduate career working on this research and related studies. To support his work, he received a Small Undergraduate Research Grant (SURG) and Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF). Bursley also received a Rothberg Research Award in Human Brain Imaging, made possible by Carnegie Mellon alumnus and trustee Jonathan M. Rothberg (E’85), founder of four genetics companies aimed at improving human health.
"Carnegie Mellon was the perfect place to carry out this work because there’s a significant focus here on pursuing new directions in mind-brain research," Bursley said. "This study is really a starting point. We also are using brain imaging to see if we find the same reactivation patterns in learning tasks that we saw here in decision-making."
CMU’s Department of Psychology has helped to establish Carnegie Mellon as a world leader in brain sciences. The university recently launched a Brain, Mind and Learning initiative to build from its research excellence in psychology, computer science and computation to continue to solve real-world problems.
For more information on how distraction improves decision-making, watch this video: http://youtu.be/eFX5S0tpTUA.
The Pittsburgh Life Sciences Greenhouse Opportunity Fund supported this research.
 
Email Story   Feedback   Print Story

 
Admission Notifications
GET LATEST ADMISSION NOTIFICATION
Admission at CIPET, Chennai
PhD in Polymer Science and Tech at University of Calcutta
D.M/M.Ch admissions at NIMS, Hyderabad
Master of Public Policy at NLSIU, Bangalore
M.Tech/M.Sc admission at DY Patil University
MDIS School of Health & Life Sciences announces admission open MSc Health Sciences (Management)
MTech in Computational Engineering at RGUKT

 
Exam/Test Alert
GET LATEST EXAM/TEST ALERT
Combined Defence Services Examination (I) – 2014 on February 9
KIITEE 2014 - Apply by March 20
PRAVARA Med/Dental PG Entrance
UPSC's Geologists Exam: Apply by Sept 23
Geologists’ Examination - 2012
IBSAT 2013: Registration commenced
IGNOU Openmat 2014: Apply by Aug 8


Advertisement

  Press Release
DEPQTNjibAA
uszbapju
 
Type of studies Edu Bodies Career Options/counseling Exam result/alert Others
  Medical
  Engineering
  Computer
  Law
  Humanities
  Statutory Bodies
  IIMs
IITs IITs
  Universities
  Boarding school
  Career Options
  Career Counselling
  Coaching
  Interview tips
  Resume Making
  Scholarship
  Exam result
  Exam Alert
  Admission
  Notifications
  Top colleges
  Top universities
  Kids Corner
  Schools
  Tender
IndiaEducationDiary Search

India Education Diary | Admission | Edu Tender | Scholarship | Exam | Notifications | Competitions | Exam Results | Edu Jobs
| About Us | Mission | Advertise with us | Contact Us | Feed Back |
2006-07 All rights reserved worldwide by www.indiaeducationdiary.com
India Education Diary